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2021

28.04.-20.06.2021

I Think I Look More like the Chrysler Building
Vleeshal
Middelburg

27.03.2021-28.03.2021

Friend of a Friend
Warsaw
Poland

2020

09.12.2020-30.01.2021

Babysteps into Masochism
Emanuel Layr
Vienna, Austria

10.09.2020-07.11.2020

Fate of a cell / Η Τύχη ενός Κυττάρου
Martinos
Athens

19.09.2020-31.10.2020

Ice to Gas
Pedro Cera
Lisbon

11.09.2020-17.19.2020

Various Others
Sperling, München
Munich, Germany

09.11.2019-08.03.2020

R.M.M. Rockefeller Center
Rockefeller Center
New York, NY

09.11.2019-08.03.2020

L’homme qui marche
Kunsthalle Bielefeld
Bielefeld, Germany

2019

27.09.2019―26.01.2020

My Fetish Years
Museum für Gegenwartskunst
Frankfurt, Germany

11.01.―16.02.2019

Germanic Artifacts
Bortolami
New York, USA

2018

13.10.―22.12.2018

Positioner
Matthew Marks
Los Angeles, USA

15.05.―21.07.2018

THEMOVE
Emanuel Layr Gallery
Vienna, Austria

03.03.―13.05.2018

An Idea of Late German Sculpture; To The People Of New York, 2018
Kunsthalle Zürich
Zürich, Switzerland

09.03.―22.07.2018

Between The Waters
Whitney Museum of Art
New York, USA

17.03.―28.04.2018

Embrassade
Fons Welters
Amsterdam, Netherlands

2017

19.01.―08.04.2017

Year Of The Monkey
Galerie Emanuel Layr
Rome, Italy

28.04.―30.07.2017

SCHREI MICH NICHT AN, KRIEGER!
Schirn Kunsthalle
Frankfurt, Germany

09.04.―30.05.2017

Vertical Gardens
Antenna Space
Shanghai, China

03.06.―03.09.2017

Die Kommenden
Sprengel Museum
Hannover, Germany

14.09.―25.10.2017

in awe
Kunsthalle Exnergasse
Vienna, Austria

06.2017

Art Basel Parcours
Art Basel
Basel, Switzerland

2016

07.06.―11.09.2016

Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions
Kaufmann Repetto
Milan, Italy

28.01.―27.02.2016

RUN, RUN, RUNWAY
Golsa
Oslo, Norway

27.02.―26.03.2016

Heartbreak Highway
Real Fine Arts
New York, USA

17.06.―27.08.2016

My History of Flow
S.A.L.T.S.
Basel, Switzerland

04.07.―16.09.2016

fat center trash land 1―7, 2016
Small scale Sculpture triennial Fellbach
Fellbach, Germany

09.09.―05.11.2016

Fieber
Emanuel Layr Gallery
Wien, Austria

04.07.―16.09.2016

In Bed with M/L Artspace
9th Berlin Biennale
Berlin, Germany

03.12.2016―12.02.2017

Available Light
Kunstverein Braunschweig
Braunschweig, Germany

2015

2015

Surrounding Audience
The New Museum Triennial
New York, USA

09.2015

Emerging Artist Fellowship Exhibition
Queens
New York, USA

26.02.―04.04.2015

Looking at you (revived) again
Off Vendom
New York, USA

28-05.―16.05.2015

One step away from further Hell
Vilma Gold
London, UK

23.11.2015―08.01.2016

National Gallery 2―Empire Map
Chewday’s
London, UK

22.02.―05.04.2015

The problem today is not the other but the self
MINI/Goethe-Institut Ludlow 38
New York, USA

2014

09.05.2014-19.07.2014

Warm Math
Balice Hertling, New York
New York

05.2014

Frieze New York
Frieze Art Fair at Randall’s Island
New York, USA

02.05.―07.06.2014

Bloomington: Mall Of America
Bortolami Gallery
New York, USA

27.04.―01.06.2014

YES, I’M PREGNANT
Skulpturen museum Glaskasten
Marl, Germany

22.03.―17.05.2014

Geburt und Familie
White Flag Projects
Saint Louis, USA

08.―09.2014

Piracanga Freedom?
Two Hotel, Piracanga Beach
Bahia, Brazil

06.06.―14.08.2014

Chat Jet (Part 2), Sculpture in Reflection
Künstlerhaus KM
Austria

06.06.―03.08.2015

Revelry
Kunsthalle Bern
Bern, Switzerland

13.09.―18.10.2014

DIE
Parisa Kind
Frankfurt, Germany

2013

14.12.2013-08.02.2014

Soft Wear
Sandy Brown
Berlin

24.02.―21.04.2013

From One Artist To Another
Kunstverein Wiesbaden
Germany

13.09.―18.10.2013

On Thomas Bayrle
The Artist’s Institute
New York, USA

05.2013

The Doors
Skulpturenpark Köln
Köln, Germany

27.06.―09.08.2013

Freak Out
Greene Naftali Gallery
New York, USA

27.09.―09.11.2013

Love of Technology
Museum of Contemporary Art
North Miami, USA

2012

05.02.2012-22.04.2012

Hang Harder
Neuer Aachener Kunstverein
Aachen, Germany

12.2012

Lena Henke: First Faces, book launch at Karma Books, New York
Karma
New York, NY

13.01.2012-19.02.2012

If I had eight hours to chop down a tree, I would spend six sharpening my axe
Kunstraum Riehen
Basel, Switzerland

01.06.―29.07.2012

Core, Cut, Care
Oldenburger Kunstverein
Germany

14.09.―21.10.2012

H․ H․ Bennett, Lena Henke and Cars
1857
Oslo, Norway

2011

15.06.―07.08.2011

Andrei Koschmieder puts
Real Fine Arts
New York, NY

23.04.―18.06.2011

Schlangen im Stall, “snakes in the barn”
Galerie Parisa Kind Frankfurt
Frankfurt am Main, Germany

2010

05.2010

WIR UEBER UNS
Neue Alte Bruecke Frankfurt
Frankfurt am Main, Germany

08.2010

you have four eyes, (First ladies)
V 8
Karlsruhe, Germany

10.2010

Scandinavian blonde
Mousonturm
Frankfurt, Germany

28.11.2009 - 23.02.2010

Stone Temple Playground Collection
Kornhauschen Aschaffenburg
Aschaffenburg, Germany

28.11.2009 - 23.02.2010

Tokyo Hotel und deine Mutter
Literaturhaus
Frankfurt, Germany

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10.09.2020-07.11.2020
Fate of a cell / Η Τύχη ενός Κυττάρου
Martinos
Athens
Text by: Sotirios Kotoulas





The exhibition, Fate of a Cell, presents a body of works from 10 artists that articulate the various scales, qualities, and characteristics of cellular structures, systems thinking and human settlements. The theory of Ekistics authored by architect Constantinos Doxiadis (1913-1975), anchors the works in their collective quest to present new directions for human settlements based on human relationships to nature and technology. Cellular units are coded and programmed over time, with patterns of human growth activity across various social, natural and technological ecosystems. These ideas are questioned, referenced, and unpacked by artists: Aristide Antonas, Bia Davou, Lois Dodd, Peter Halley, Lena Henke, Charlotte Posenenske, Ettore Sottsass, Vivian Suter, Oscar Tuazon and Constantinos Doxiadis.

The etymologic origin of the word cell (Latin) is celare, to hide, conceal or cella, a small room. In the 12th century, cell was used to describe a small monastery and in the 14th century, a small room for a monk or a nun. By the 17th century organic biological forms are described as cells and scientific biological discoveries in the 19th century introduce terms like cell-division, cell membrane and cell-body to our lexicon. The microscope revealed invisible cellular structures of plants and animals; typically circular in form, containing a nucleus surrounded by a thin membrane. In 2020, the Covid pandemic revives the notion of the cell and the consequences of individual and collective action.

The circular diagram of the cell is a biological truth imbued with mythological and symbolic meaning. The circle is a universal symbol of totality and wholeness, infinity, with spatial and temporal limits. In nomadic cultures, dynamism and movement was symbolized by tents erected in a circular plan. Concentric circles symbolize solar and lunar domains across their phased cycles. The variables of time; past, present, and future are depicted as three concentric circles, interdependent of one another. From microscopic to cosmic scales, cellular cycles of growth and death are influenced by human interaction with nature. The traces of this cyclical growth are found in works of art and architecture.

Circular cellular forms, concentric circles and rings, lifted from nature, are often used to articulate order, unveil symbolic meaning, and propose a new form of architectural urbanism and growth. In order to reach a city of optimum size, Doxiadis proposed a science of human settlements titled Ekistics; that considers “the principles man takes into account when building his settlements, as well as the evolution of human settlements through history in terms of size and quality.” This comprehensive approach includes the entire range of settlements; from “primitive” to “developed,” broken down into a “complex system of five elements – nature, man, society, shells (that is buildings), and networks.” This new model for metropolitan growth responds to human dimensions as seen through the “economic, social, political, technological and cultural” layers. The tripartite system incorporates “natural, social and man-made elements” in an attempt to invent “general principles and laws” for urban growth that are an “extension of man’s biological characteristics.” In this science, the human condition confronts natural terrestrial and cosmic dimensions through the articulation of energy.

Doxiadis defines several principles that have shaped human settlements over time. The first principle involves maximizing human contact with the elements of nature. Our obsession with conquering and controlling nature via technologic and instrumental means, blind us from determining our optimal relationship with nature. We do not know when we have reached our optimal relative state because of the voracious appetite to dominate natural resources and energy. This domination is driven by the value of excess, and is not related to human needs and their impact on the health of our environment. If we are presented with the possibility to extract more energy, history shows we blindly extract more without calculating the negative impacts of pollution. The second principle discloses our tendency to expend the least amount of energy and effort as we determine the structures, forms, and routes of our physical world. The third principle determines our protective space from other people, animals, and objects by separation; to ensure we maintain our sensory and psychological comforts. The walls of a house, transportation routes, fortifications and barriers are physical manifestations of this third principle. The fourth principle designs a physiological and aesthetic ordering system to optimize our relationship to the environment; “nature, society, shells (buildings and houses of all sorts), and networks (ranging from roads to telecommunications).” This ordering system directly affects architecture and art. In the fifth principle, humans organize their settlements to optimize the previous four principles in present contexts and conditions to synthesize a “balance between man and his man-made environment.”

The key factor that directly affects the fate of a cell involves “the distance man wants to go or can go in the course of his daily life.” The individual makes up the primary unit. The secondary unit is the personal space that belongs to the individual, and this space can be shared. The third unit is the family home and the fourth unit is a group of homes; a collection of cells that form a society. The fifth unit encompasses all human settlements on planet Earth. The maximum personal walking distance in a day creates a transit radius from which to measure from. When one walks, one has access to more points of contact and transactional exchanges. As a city grows, the car greatly increases the transit radius and allows for rapid growth, migration, and class displacement, but ultimately reduces the points of contact. In ancient Athens, Perikles’ pedestrian route from home to the Assembly allowed him to meet approximately 100 to 150 people which gave him a consistent daily sample of public opinion. This path traveled provided many points of contact that contributed to his democratic duties as general of Athens. Thus, the design and form of units at varying scales presents an “extension of man in space (in terms of his physical dimensions and senses) and follows biological and structural laws.” Understanding the genesis of these forms - morphogenesis – allows us to identify patterns that can inform an empirical system of growth; a programmed (computed) synthesis of conditions from the human and natural domains. The emergence of new patterns and dynamic systems inform a feedback loop of new general principles and laws for cellular growth. This show grants us the opportunity to experience these concepts in the present qualitative and quantitative realm, freed from the limits of computational programming and empiricism. One navigates and measures the transformational forces of human settlement and nature through direct synesthetic experience. The symbiotic relationships override the limits of instrumental programming and express the full dimensions of sensual experience, offering a new apparatus for Ekistics.

*all quotes by Constantinos Doxiadis from Ekistics, the Science of Human Settlements, 1970.

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